The $4500 Game Driver and Workstation

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The CPU

Let’s get started on our $4500 (including costs of out of stock items which will not factor into the total price in the pcpartpicker list) gaming/workstation monster. The central processing unit we opted to use for this build is the Ryzen 7 1800X, because well, when you’re doing a nocompromises Ryzen build, is there really another option? Not yet at least. The 1800X is $419 at the time of making this article and an eight core, sixteen thread monster, clocking in at a base clock of 4Ghz. Despite these incredible specs its TDP is a mere 95W.

CPU Cooling

A Corsair H100i was used for this build. The H100i is an all in one liquid cooler with dual 120mm fan support. This cooler is a high end AIO cooler and as a result costs $109 at the time of making this article. The thermal paste we paired with this cooler is Arctic Silver 5 highdensity polysynthetic silver at $14 for 12 grams.

The Motherboard

The motherboard chosen for this project is the Asus Crosshair VI Hero. This motherboard costs $236 at the time of making this video and supports a lot of extra features that would be missed in such a high-end build. These things include SLI Support, 8 6GB/s SATA ports, M.2  support, 2 USB 3.1, 8 USB 3.0, 4 USB 2.0, and 5 gold plated audio jacks. Despite this board being recommended by us, make sure to get a board that suits your needs. Remember, you could technically get the cheapest possible board on the market for AM4 and one video card; although we would not recommend that, because it would not be aesthetically pleasing and would lack many features, causing a high-end build to feel incomplete.

The RAM

For this build we went with 32GB of quad channel DDR4-3466 by Corsair. This RAM despite hitting the important bullets, like quantity, and decent speed (higher speeds hit a limit of effectiveness outside of benchmarks), running in quad channel, and more, we chose it because it hits the most important point of all, RGB. This RAM will run you $359 but you could choose a smaller package, or even cut the RGB if it helps it fit your budget better.

Storage

For storage in this build a 1TB M.2 SSD from Western Digital is being used as the boot drive, for $288 that gives it an effective cost of $0.29/GB. As the secondary drive for storing games or projects, or whatnot a Seagate 3TB hard drive is being used, at $157 when in stock this gives it an effective cost of $0.5/GB.

Graphics Card

The graphics card selected for this build is an EVGA 1080Ti black edition. At $719 it packs a massive punch including 11GB of GDDR5X video RAM, 1.56GHz base clock, but a massive power draw of 250W. To keep this build from getting too expensive we went with one card, which also prevents micro-stuttering, but if you really want to go all out you could easily pick up a second, just make sure to pick up a high quality after market SLI bridge after the fact.

Graphics Card

The graphics card selected for this build is an EVGA 1080Ti black edition. At $719 it packs a massive punch including 11GB of GDDR5X video RAM, 1.56GHz base clock, but a massive power draw of 250W. To keep this build from getting too expensive we went with one card, which also prevents micro-stuttering, but if you really want to go all out you could easily pick up a second, just make sure to pick up a high quality after market SLI bridge after the fact.

Chassis

The chassis selected for this build was selected because of its compatibility (although with such a large GPU not all drive cages will be usable), and satisfying looks. You could pick any case that fits the parts and your budget, but we chose the Phanteks Enthoo Primo at $249

Power Supply

A Corsair 1200W modular power supply with 80+ platinum efficiency was used for this build. Obviously, this is massive overkill, but will make the power supply run very quiet, if that’s  something of importance to you. This particular power supply is $269 on Corsairs website, but is currently out of stock.

Peripherals

Two different monitors were selected for this list to allow for two different types of gaming experiences. The first is a 31 inch LG 4K monitor, which runs at 60Hz. The second monitor is an Acer 27 inch, 2K monitor which runs at 165Hz.

The keyboard used for this setup is Corsairs K95 wired gaming keyboard. This keyboard features Cherry MX red switches, USB pass-through, metal construction, a wrist rest, and is backlit. This keyboard runs at about $150.

The mouse selected for this list is the, to match, Corsair Raptor M4, and is a wired laser mouse. It has lighting affects and is designed for right-handed users. This mouse costs $60.

Again, going with the Corsair theme, the Corsair Void with 7.1 audio channels, using a USB 2.0 connector. It runs about $60 and has RGB lighting on the sides. We also included a pair of Logitech speakers which cost $25.

Assorted Items

We even went through the trouble of picking out a $106 Asus Blu-Ray, DVD/CD read and writer for your optical drive. You’ll be the coolest, hippest kid on the block with this bad boy.

Windows 10 was selected as the operating system for this build, although it got thrown into assorted items since usually someone investing this money into a computer, already knows what OS they want, or even has a key already. Regardless this bumps the price $92.

An Asus - Essence STX II was picked out for a sound card for any audiophiles. If you do buy this, ensure you get less game oriented, and more audio attentive headphones than the ones listed before. Sennheiser’s would be a wonderful compliment to this sound card, which runs in at $238.

We also included a $60 Rosewill Wi-Fi receiver although honestly, with this build, we expect better than Wi-Fi from you.

Finally, we included an NZXT fan controller, which would pair nicely with some Noctua high performance 120mm fans, preferably ones that use static pressure. Although it would work with any old fan, including the pre-installed ones, we just wanted to recommend high quality fans for your high-quality system. This fan controller costs $29.

These prices and parts can be found here (link this: PC Part Picker) and adjusted to more accurately suit you.

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George Johnston-Lunn

Gaming since could handle a mouse and keyboard, although mainly a PC Gamer has a long history with Nintendo Consoles. Main author for the Hardware reviews and the indie game articles. Canadian.

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